Brawl at the Ballpark

A few weeks ago, I shared the passion Orioles fans had for baseball and fair calls. This week, I’m sharing how a little common courtesy at the ballpark could have saved a little time, trouble and money for two spectators. In August 1912, Joseph F. Kennedy, having gotten to the Oriole Park early, settled in... Continue Reading →

‘Candle, Breeze, Blaze’

A perfect storm of circumstances started a fire at a residence in 1911 Baltimore. “A candle, loose wall paper and a breeze blowing in the open window of the kitchen at 129 South Caroline street” started a “slight blaze” in Louis Ginsman’s home, according to a Baltimore Sun article with the headline “Candle, Breeze, Blaze.”... Continue Reading →

Updegraff’s Clothiers, Hatters and Furnishers

West Washington Street in downtown Hagerstown is a treasure trove of ghost signs. Down the road from Eyerly’s Department Store is the painted ghost sign of the long-shuttered Updegraff’s Clothiers, Hatters and Furnishers. The unassuming, fading sign has been prominently displayed at the top of a four-story building for decades. “It is apparently the oldest... Continue Reading →

The Accidental Poisoning of Miss Nierhaus

Accidental poisonings seemed to take place often a century ago. One such incident involved the poisoning of Miss Teresa Nierhaus at the hands of her friend in August 1911. The Baltimore Sun reported that the 22-year-old woman, who was living on West Lexington Street in Baltimore, thought she was taking a dose of paregoric, which... Continue Reading →

‘Eggs for Umpire’

With the start of baseball season last week, this incident from July 1, 1904 can resonate with all the Orioles fans who have ever been frustrated by umpires’ calls. “Aged eggs were the feature of yesterday’s ball game at Oriole Park,” began the Baltimore Sun article. “They were intended for an umpire who had been... Continue Reading →

From the New Windsor Museum (Carroll County): “Sun Dial from Garden of Dielman Inn "Dated 1909, this sun dial was a fixture behind the Dielman Inn until 2010. Attributed to Sir Charles Leonard Woolley (1880-1960), famous British archaeologist and discoverer of Ur, the ancient city of Abraham, now in today’s Iraq. Woolley is said to... Continue Reading →

‘This Cigarette Did Mischief’

A canvas awning on fire alerted police to unlawful activity in August 1911 — working on a Sunday. Firefighters put out the fire at 108 West Baltimore Street, then police started investigating its cause. “In going upstairs they say they found seven men at work on the third floor and three men sitting in an... Continue Reading →

This mural was painted in 1999 and based on an 1877 map of Westminster. It sits on Locust Lane in downtown Westminster, the county seat of Carroll County. Photo taken March 16, 2018.

Thrown Kiss Causes Heartache

A kiss blown to a young man caused mystery, fear, illness and heartache for one family in 1911 Baltimore. In April 1911, 18-year-old Mary Tamburo was “caught throwing kisses to a young German" and, after she was "scolded" for the act, ran away from home, according to a July 1911 Baltimore Sun article. Her parents... Continue Reading →

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