In the Buff on the Tracks

A railroad worker got quite a shock one evening in 1903 when he saw a “gleaming white” figure suddenly appear and slowly approach him on the railroad tracks. Pennsylvania Railroad worker Joseph Kingsley was standing in front of the Frederick Road station around 9 p.m. one March evening when he spotted a “perfectly nude man”... Continue Reading →

‘A Mother’s Duty’

Mothers were warned of the dangers of immodest fashion and other activities that endangered their daughters’ morals one Sunday evening in 1912 at First Baptist Church. Dr. O.C.S. Wallace shared these dangers in his message “Present Perils and Problems,” according to the Baltimore Sun. “He said: ‘Indecent fashions in dress, which were doubtless intended by... Continue Reading →

Brawl at the Ballpark

A few weeks ago, I shared the passion Orioles fans had for baseball and fair calls. This week, I’m sharing how a little common courtesy at the ballpark could have saved a little time, trouble and money for two spectators. In August 1912, Joseph F. Kennedy, having gotten to the Oriole Park early, settled in... Continue Reading →

‘Candle, Breeze, Blaze’

A perfect storm of circumstances started a fire at a residence in 1911 Baltimore. “A candle, loose wall paper and a breeze blowing in the open window of the kitchen at 129 South Caroline street” started a “slight blaze” in Louis Ginsman’s home, according to a Baltimore Sun article with the headline “Candle, Breeze, Blaze.”... Continue Reading →

The Accidental Poisoning of Miss Nierhaus

Accidental poisonings seemed to take place often a century ago. One such incident involved the poisoning of Miss Teresa Nierhaus at the hands of her friend in August 1911. The Baltimore Sun reported that the 22-year-old woman, who was living on West Lexington Street in Baltimore, thought she was taking a dose of paregoric, which... Continue Reading →

‘This Cigarette Did Mischief’

A canvas awning on fire alerted police to unlawful activity in August 1911 — working on a Sunday. Firefighters put out the fire at 108 West Baltimore Street, then police started investigating its cause. “In going upstairs they say they found seven men at work on the third floor and three men sitting in an... Continue Reading →

Thrown Kiss Causes Heartache

A kiss blown to a young man caused mystery, fear, illness and heartache for one family in 1911 Baltimore. In April 1911, 18-year-old Mary Tamburo was “caught throwing kisses to a young German" and, after she was "scolded" for the act, ran away from home, according to a July 1911 Baltimore Sun article. Her parents... Continue Reading →

Fickle Weather for 1845 St. Patrick’s Day

I love the detailed newspaper weather reports of yesteryear! Let’s all be glad that our St. Patrick’s Day weather forecast is not like what Baltimoreans experienced on March 17, 1845, as reported by the Baltimore Sun: “First came a regular snow storm, each flake as big as a dollar — then came a disagreeable rain... Continue Reading →

‘Sea of Beer in Her Saloon’

Mrs. Mary Koerner received quite a surprise when she entered her Highlandtown saloon one late March morning in 1911. ‘...[S]he was greeted with a veritable ocean of beer flowing over the floor. Floating on it were cigars, some whole, some stumps and some that were ‘entirely too young to be left to drown,’” reported The... Continue Reading →

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