The Accidental Poisoning of Miss Nierhaus

Accidental poisonings seemed to take place often a century ago. One such incident involved the poisoning of Miss Teresa Nierhaus at the hands of her friend in August 1911. The Baltimore Sun reported that the 22-year-old woman, who was living on West Lexington Street in Baltimore, thought she was taking a dose of paregoric, which... Continue Reading →

‘This Cigarette Did Mischief’

A canvas awning on fire alerted police to unlawful activity in August 1911 — working on a Sunday. Firefighters put out the fire at 108 West Baltimore Street, then police started investigating its cause. “In going upstairs they say they found seven men at work on the third floor and three men sitting in an... Continue Reading →

Thrown Kiss Causes Heartache

A kiss blown to a young man caused mystery, fear, illness and heartache for one family in 1911 Baltimore. In April 1911, 18-year-old Mary Tamburo was “caught throwing kisses to a young German" and, after she was "scolded" for the act, ran away from home, according to a July 1911 Baltimore Sun article. Her parents... Continue Reading →

Fickle Weather for 1845 St. Patrick’s Day

I love the detailed newspaper weather reports of yesteryear! Let’s all be glad that our St. Patrick’s Day weather forecast is not like what Baltimoreans experienced on March 17, 1845, as reported by the Baltimore Sun: “First came a regular snow storm, each flake as big as a dollar — then came a disagreeable rain... Continue Reading →

‘Sea of Beer in Her Saloon’

Mrs. Mary Koerner received quite a surprise when she entered her Highlandtown saloon one late March morning in 1911. ‘...[S]he was greeted with a veritable ocean of beer flowing over the floor. Floating on it were cigars, some whole, some stumps and some that were ‘entirely too young to be left to drown,’” reported The... Continue Reading →

‘A Park Bench and A Bogus Policeman’

Like today, thieves of yesteryear had some pretty creative ways of getting what they wanted. Take, for instance, the man who impersonated a park police officer for some easy cash in February 1897 Baltimore. It happened when Harry Crooks — the son of a police officer — was sitting on a park bench in Druid... Continue Reading →

No Understudies, No Show

Sometimes the show mustn’t go on, as was the case at the Lyric in January 1904 Baltimore. The production of The Ninety and Nine had been taking place there and enjoyed by large audiences. But it seems that a cold that swept through the cast halted further performances. “There are about 30 in the cast,... Continue Reading →

Bakery Robbers Take All

Three robbers added insult to injury when they robbed Isaac Silber’s bakery in 1932 Baltimore. “Isaac Silber doesn’t mind so much that three young men robbed his till last night, but he wishes they’d hand the cash register back so he could find out how much the robbery cost him,” The Baltimore Sun reported on... Continue Reading →

Cowhide Justice in Baltimore

In 1898 Baltimore, hotelkeeper J.L. Boswell had a unique way of settling a debt with a man who wouldn’t pay. Boswell caused a scene on the corner of Lexington and Calvert streets, according to The Baltimore Sun, after a conversation with a man who owed him money took a turn. “The men were seen to... Continue Reading →

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