Glade Valley Mill

Driving along Creagerstown Road in the small town of Woodsboro, passersby can't help but notice the imposing maroon structure once known as the Glade Valley Mill, a town fixture since the late 1800s. The business was originally started in nearby Troutville by Daniel Saylor. In the 1890s, Anderson Etzler moved the business to be closer... Continue Reading →

The Dwayyo: ‘Don’t Mess with It’

In November 1965, a Frederick County newspaper received a call from a tipster reporting that he fought off a frightening creature in his backyard — the dwayyo. In The News article “Mysterious ‘Dwayyo’ On Loose In County” (complete with the subhed “Don’t Mess with It”), a man named John Becker reported fending off a 6-foot-tall,... Continue Reading →

Sightings of a snallygaster — a mysterious creature with a curious name — brought fright and concern to the Middletown valley (Frederick County) and beyond in the first few decades of the 20th century.   “For those not in the know,” according to a 1965 article in The News, “a snallygaster is said to be a... Continue Reading →

Kehne Bros. & Wachter Bros.

On East All Saints Street, further evidence of downtown Frederick’s industrial roots can be found with the fading signs for confections and bottling operations. The Kehne Brothers confectioners had operated in other areas of downtown Frederick for years and moved to the warehouse on East All Saints Street in September 1916, “...where we will be... Continue Reading →

Ceresville Flour Mill

Driving through the blink-and-you'll-miss-it community of Ceresville, one can’t help but notice the beautiful limestone shell of a mill that has the distinction of being the first mill in Frederick County. Known as the Ceresville Flour Mill, or Kelly’s Mill after its last owners, the building sits near the intersection of Route 26 and Route 194... Continue Reading →

Central Chemical Company

It may be hard to imagine now, but many fertilizer companies once lined downtown Frederick’s South Carroll Street in the 1800s. Painted on a tan, nondescript building facing the street, one can make out the remnants of a sign identifying the Central Chemical Company. Tyson’s Phosphate Factory/J. Tyson & Son was one these fertilizer companies,... Continue Reading →

A WordPress.com Website.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: