The Accidental Poisoning of Miss Nierhaus

Accidental poisonings seemed to take place often a century ago. One such incident involved the poisoning of Miss Teresa Nierhaus at the hands of her friend in August 1911. The Baltimore Sun reported that the 22-year-old woman, who was living on West Lexington Street in Baltimore, thought she was taking a dose of paregoric, which... Continue Reading →

From the New Windsor Museum (Carroll County): “Sun Dial from Garden of Dielman Inn "Dated 1909, this sun dial was a fixture behind the Dielman Inn until 2010. Attributed to Sir Charles Leonard Woolley (1880-1960), famous British archaeologist and discoverer of Ur, the ancient city of Abraham, now in today’s Iraq. Woolley is said to... Continue Reading →

‘This Cigarette Did Mischief’

A canvas awning on fire alerted police to unlawful activity in August 1911 — working on a Sunday. Firefighters put out the fire at 108 West Baltimore Street, then police started investigating its cause. “In going upstairs they say they found seven men at work on the third floor and three men sitting in an... Continue Reading →

Thrown Kiss Causes Heartache

A kiss blown to a young man caused mystery, fear, illness and heartache for one family in 1911 Baltimore. In April 1911, 18-year-old Mary Tamburo was “caught throwing kisses to a young German" and, after she was "scolded" for the act, ran away from home, according to a July 1911 Baltimore Sun article. Her parents... Continue Reading →

Fickle Weather for 1845 St. Patrick’s Day

I love the detailed newspaper weather reports of yesteryear! Let’s all be glad that our St. Patrick’s Day weather forecast is not like what Baltimoreans experienced on March 17, 1845, as reported by the Baltimore Sun: “First came a regular snow storm, each flake as big as a dollar — then came a disagreeable rain... Continue Reading →

Lewis M. Kintz Groceries & Provisions

Though time and weather has faded it, the painted advertisement on the side of the building on East Fourth Street in Frederick is mostly still legible, identifying the former establishment: Lewis M. Kintz Groceries & Provisions. Underneath is a bit more difficult to read and has been marred by graffiti, but appears to be an... Continue Reading →

‘Sea of Beer in Her Saloon’

Mrs. Mary Koerner received quite a surprise when she entered her Highlandtown saloon one late March morning in 1911. ‘...[S]he was greeted with a veritable ocean of beer flowing over the floor. Floating on it were cigars, some whole, some stumps and some that were ‘entirely too young to be left to drown,’” reported The... Continue Reading →

Valentine’s Day 1887

In a piece called “Cupid’s Missives” in The News (Frederick) the day after Valentine’s Day 1887, observations about the growing holiday were made, including the type of valentines that were being purchased: “In consequence of the scope and character of the day, the mails at our postoffice [sic] yesterday were unusually heavy. The stationers report the sales... Continue Reading →

Love Potions Land Man in Jail

The ads were placed in newspapers in the Midwest, enticing those unlucky in love: “Parted friends, sweethearts, husbands, or wives brought together, either sex; everything strictly confidential. Send stamp. F. M. Brown, Smithsburg, Md.” “Friendship or love easily won or regained, 10 cents. F. M. Brown, Smithsburg, Md.” But these promises to the lovelorn were... Continue Reading →

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