Halloween Mischief Gone Too Far

It seems as though some youth took the Halloween pranks a little too far in Westminster (Carroll County) in 1881. The Democratic Advocate outlined some of the damage caused — and possible consequences — for those responsible. “Breaking window-panes, daubing houses with mud, tearing away and breaking doorsteps and yard gates and fences, throwing corn... Continue Reading →

1907 Homecoming Week

In 1907, Governor Edwin Warfield decided that Maryland should have a Homecoming Week. “In launching this project he said … that he believed that the city and State both were ripe for an occasion of this character,” according to the Baltimore Sun. “He recited the fact that there were thousands of persons scattered throughout the... Continue Reading →

Looking for Leaves

With a touch of autumn now in the air—and perhaps our hot and humid days finally behind us—it’s time to look forward to the beautiful fall foliage that graces our area. However, in 1899, Frederick area farmers looked forward to these fall leaves for a slightly different reason. They used it as bedding for their animals.... Continue Reading →

Strange Accidents

The following incidents reported in the late 1880s and 1890s show us how life can change in an instant: A Fork in the Eye In 1897, Mrs. Hobbs, the wife of farmer Wm. M. Hobbs living near Sykesville (Carroll County), lost an eye after attempting to untie a knot. “She was trying to untie a... Continue Reading →

T.W. Mather & Sons

Walking along East Main Street in Westminster, the county seat of Carroll County, one can find clues from the city’s past. Take, for example, the words “T.W. Mather & Sons” etched into one of the buildings, the remnants of one of the city’s downtown shopping destinations. A description of the former establishment from a 1996... Continue Reading →

A Deadly Lightning Strike

This year, rain clouds, lightning and thunderstorms replaced the bountiful sunshine we usually experience during summer. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, July 2018 rainfall in Baltimore beat a record set in 1889 (16.73 inches vs. 11.03 inches). In June 1900, an intense storm demonstrated the power of nature when it took the life of... Continue Reading →

Henry and Christina

My father and I took a field trip last week. We visited Prospect Hill Cemetery in Washington, D.C., to find the grave sites of my great-great grandparents, great-grandparents and great-grand aunt, which we did successfully with the assistance of the cemetery’s very helpful superintendent. Prospect Hill Cemetery is a historic German-American cemetery on North Capitol... Continue Reading →

Postcard: Mountain Lake Park

In 1905, Mr. T. Emlyn Moore of Grampian, Pennsylvania, received a postcard outlining the enjoyable time that was had in Mountain Lake Park, a town found in Garrett County just a few miles away from Oakland. The postcard, featuring a photo of the Hotel Chautauqua, read: “First day, five o’clock just got home from meeting.... Continue Reading →

A Hot Independence Day

It seems as though those in Baltimore in 1901 had the same steamy weather for their Independence Day celebrations as we’ll have today, according to a Baltimore Sun article. “The celebration of Independence Day in Baltimore had all the usual features, crowds in the parks and at the resorts near the city, displays of fireworks,... Continue Reading →

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